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Khadijah Ali-Coleman, Ed.D.
SCHOLARLY WORK






 
The Depiction of Homeschooling, Black Identity, and Political Thought in the Film Black Panther by Khadijah Ali-Coleman, Ed.D.

(CHAPTER IN THE BOOK: Afrofuturism in Black Panther: Gender, Identity, and the Re-Making of Blackness, 2021)

edited by Renee T. White and Karen A. Ritzenhoff

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ABSTRACT

The main characters of the Afrofuturist odyssey Black Panther provide a platform to discuss the impact of homeschooling as liberatory practice. Black Panther’s Killmonger and T’Challa, two male characters homeschooled by their respective fathers during their primary years, hold worldviews shaped by traditional cultural practice and intensive ancestral history lessons.  What the film depicts and what the research shows is that homeschool education provides an armor of cultural awareness that empowers and emboldens. Using bell hooks’ theory of education as a liberatory practice, the author offers an analysis of how Killmonger and T’Challa represent two ideals, both founded in homeschool education, both illustrating unique renderings of Black identity.

 

Homeschooling Black Children in the US: Theory, Practice & Popular Culture (IAP, 2022)
edited by Khadijah Ali-Coleman and Cheryl Fields-Smith

 

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ABSTRACT

In 2021, the United States Census Bureau reported that in 2020, during the rise of the global health pandemic COVID-19, homeschooling among Black families increased five-fold. However, Black families had begun choosing to homeschool even before COVID-19 led to school closures and disrupted traditional school spaces. Homeschooling Black Children in the US: Theory, Practice and Popular Culture offers an insightful look at the growing practice of homeschooling by Black families through this timely collection of articles by education practitioners, researchers, homeschooling parents and homeschooled children.

Homeschooling Black Children in the US: Theory, Practice and Popular Culture honestly presents how systemic racism and other factors influence the decision of Black families to homeschool. In addition, the book chapters illustrate in different ways how self-determination manifests within the homeschooling practice. Researchers Khadijah Ali-Coleman and Cheryl Fields-Smith have edited a compilation of work that explores the varied experiences of parents homeschooling Black children before, during and after COVID-19. From veteran homeschooling parents sharing their practice to researchers reporting their data collected pre-COVID, this anthology of work presents an overview that gives substantive insight into what the practice of homeschooling looks like for many Black families in the United States.

 


Dual Enrolled African American Homeschooled Students' Perceptions of Preparedness for Community College
(ProQuest, 2020)

by Khadijah Ali-Coleman, Ed.D.

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ABSTRACT

The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological study was to capture African American homeschooled students’ perceptions of preparedness for community college. While dual enrolled, homeschooled students are not a monolith, variations exist among their individual experiences. Their placement outside of the traditional schooling paradigm presented a fresh perspective when examining student perceptions of preparedness and college transition. This study was analyzed using Critical Race Theory (CRT) as a lens and Weidman’s model of undergraduate socialization as a design tool. Findings in this study include fivespecific indicators of preparedness that revolve around the ability to demonstrate (1) effective communication with faculty and peers, (2) effective time management, (3) timely and competent coursework completion, (4) self-awareness of academic strengths and interests and (5) cultural identity and awareness.

 

CITATIONS:

MLA: Ali-Coleman, Khadijah Zakia. Dual Enrolled African American Homeschooled Students’ Perceptions of Preparedness for Community College. Diss. Morgan State University, 2020.

APA: Ali-Coleman, K. Z. (2020). Dual Enrolled African American Homeschooled Students’ Perceptions of Preparedness for Community College (Doctoral dissertation, Morgan State University).

CHICAGO: Ali-Coleman, Khadijah Zakia. "Dual Enrolled African American Homeschooled Students’ Perceptions of Preparedness for Community College." PhD diss., Morgan State University, 2020.

HARVARD: Ali-Coleman, K.Z., 2020. Dual Enrolled African American Homeschooled Students’ Perceptions of Preparedness for Community College (Doctoral dissertation, Morgan State University).


Essential pathways: An examination of how community colleges compromise their unique contributions to American higher education
(Higher Education Politics & Economics, 2019)

by Khadijah Ali-Coleman, Ed.D.

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ABSTRACT
Community colleges in the United States have historically held a unique position within the system of higher education because of three characteristics. These characteristics include their doctrine of open access, their consistent affordability in comparison to other higher education options, and courses that are directly applicable to the workforce. However, over the years, contradictions have arisen that compromise the practice of these ideals. Focusing on three policy priorities, this analysis determines how effective community colleges are today in offering students an education that is accessible, applicable to the labor market, and affordable. The concluding points include predictions of what the future of community colleges looks like within the next twenty years.